blackswanyoga:

#atx #sunset #texas

Sometimes this town is pretty great.

blackswanyoga:

#atx #sunset #texas

Sometimes this town is pretty great.

boxlunches:

galesofnovember:

liketheghost:

so is it a thing in (american) english to use “texas” as a word for like, something that’s out of control or chaotic, or as like, “crazy”? like “that party last weekend was totally texas!” 

because that is a thing people say in norwegian and i just think it’s important for americans to know that? 

this is the best thing I’ve ever heard

actual Texan here cackling insanely

Beautiful.

(via awholehandful)

chaniatreides:

THIS IS THE OTHER PART OF MY LIFE

Good lord, these two!

(via goodstuffhappenedtoday)

theroguefeminist:

c2ndy2c1d:

coelasquid:

ibelieveinyoumyapollo:

lakidaa:

that’s suave as shit

Wow

Me on my way to steal ur footballer

i love sports

Celebrations are by far the best part of the world cup. These guys are smooth as hell.

(via wasarahbi)

Another great installment of Feminist Frequency 

mentalflossr:

12 Post-Potter Secrets J.K. Rowling Has Shared
Insights from J.K. Rowling about Harry and friends since the final book was published.

I knew most of these, but it was still a fun read!

mentalflossr:

12 Post-Potter Secrets J.K. Rowling Has Shared

Insights from J.K. Rowling about Harry and friends since the final book was published.

I knew most of these, but it was still a fun read!

kgoldschmitt:

From The Little Girl from the 1981 Lego Ad Is All Grown Up, and She’s Got Something To Say.
“Toys are supposed to foster creativity. But nowadays, it seems that a lot more toys already have messages built into them before a child even opens the pink or blue package. In 1981, LEGOs were simple and gender-neutral, and the creativity of the child produced the message. In 2014, it’s the reverse: the toy delivers a message to the child, and this message is weirdly about gender.”

Why don’t people get this??!?! Drives me absolutely crazy and I don’t even have kids yet. Why must we force gender norms on our tiny humans?

kgoldschmitt:

From The Little Girl from the 1981 Lego Ad Is All Grown Up, and She’s Got Something To Say.

Toys are supposed to foster creativity. But nowadays, it seems that a lot more toys already have messages built into them before a child even opens the pink or blue package. In 1981, LEGOs were simple and gender-neutral, and the creativity of the child produced the message. In 2014, it’s the reverse: the toy delivers a message to the child, and this message is weirdly about gender.”

Why don’t people get this??!?! Drives me absolutely crazy and I don’t even have kids yet. Why must we force gender norms on our tiny humans?

(via mominleggings)

taktophoto:

The most beautiful flowering cherry worldwide

Beautiful. Enjoy your Saturday everyone!

(via goodstuffhappenedtoday)

Okay, okay, I’m going to tell you what Hermione sees in Ron.

A trio is a balancing act, right? They’re equalizers of each other. Harry’s like the action, Hermione’s the brains, Ron’s the heart. Hermione has been assassinated in these movies, and I mean that genuinely—by giving her every single positive character trait that Ron has, they have assassinated her character in the movies. She’s been harmed by being made to be less human, because everything good Ron has, she’s been given.

So, for instance: “If you want to kill Harry, you’re going to have to kill me too”—RON, leg is broken, he’s in pain, gets up and stands in front of Harry and says this. Who gets that line in the movie? Hermione.

“Fear of a name increases the fear of the thing itself.” Hermione doesn’t say Voldemort’s name until well into the books—that’s Dumbledore’s line. When does Hermione say it in the movies? Beginning of Movie 2.

When the Devil’s Snare is curling itself around everybody, Hermione panics, and Ron is the one who keeps his head and says “Are you a witch or not?” In the movie, everybody else panics and Hermione keeps her head and does the biggest, brightest flare of sunlight spell there ever was.

So, Hermione—all her flaws were shaved away in the films. And that sounds like you’re making a kick-ass, amazing character, and what you’re doing is dehumanizing her. And it pisses me off. It really does.

In the books, they balance each other out, because where Hermione gets frazzled and maybe her rationality overtakes some of her instinct, Ron has that to back it up; Ron has a kind of emotional grounding that can keep Hermione’s hyper-rationalness in check. Sometimes Hermione’s super-logical nature grates Harry and bothers him, and isn’t the thing he needs even if it’s the right thing, like when she says “You have a saving people thing.” That is the thing that Harry needed to hear, she’s a hundred percent right, but the way she does it is wrong. That’s the classic “she’s super logical, she’s super brilliant, but she doesn’t know how to handle people emotionally,” at least Harry.

So in the books they are this balanced group, and in the movies, in the movies—hell, not even Harry is good enough for Hermione in the movies. No one’s good enough for Hermione in the movies—God isn’t good enough for Hermione in the movies! Hermione is everybody’s everything in the movies.

Harry’s idea to jump on the dragon in the books, who gets it in the movies? Hermione, who hates to fly. Hermione, who overcomes her withering fear of flying to take over Harry’s big idea to get out of the—like, why does Hermione get all these moments?

[John: Because we need to market the movie to girls.]

I think girls like the books, period. And like the Hermione in the books, and like the Hermione in the books just fine before Hollywood made her idealized and perfect. And if they would have trusted that, they would have been just fine.

Would the movies have been bad if she was as awesome as she was in the books, and as human as she was in the books? Would the movies get worse?

She IS a strong girl character. This is the thing that pisses me off. They are equating “strong” with superhuman. To me, the Hermione in the book is twelve times stronger than the completely unreachable ideal of Hermione in the movies. Give me the Hermione in the book who’s human and has flaws any single day of the week.

Here’s a classic example: When Snape in the first book yells at Hermione for being an insufferable know-it-all, do you want to know what Ron says in the book? “Well, you’re asking the questions, and she has to answer. Why ask if you don’t want to be told?” What does he say in the movie? “He’s got a point, you know.” Ron? Would never do that. Would NEVER do that, even before he liked Hermione. Ron would never do that.

— Melissa Anelli THROWS IT DOWN about the way Ron and Hermione have been adapted in the movies on the latest episode of PotterCast. Listen here. This glorious rant starts at about 49:00. (via karakamos)

(via boricuayari)

two4fit:

Tabloid headlines without the sexism

(via thefrogman)

fishingboatproceeds:

elysemarshall:

newyorker:

In the magazine this week, Margaret Talbot profiles the novelist John Green, and looks at how he created a vibrant fan community long before the release of his best-selling book, “The Fault in Our Stars”: http://nyr.kr/1iMf1MN
Illustration by Bartosz Kosowski.

It’s a long read, but well worth the time. Fantastic piece.

The best piece yet written, I think, about my books and the history of nerdfighteria. 

fishingboatproceeds:

elysemarshall:

newyorker:

In the magazine this week, Margaret Talbot profiles the novelist John Green, and looks at how he created a vibrant fan community long before the release of his best-selling book, “The Fault in Our Stars”: http://nyr.kr/1iMf1MN

Illustration by Bartosz Kosowski.

It’s a long read, but well worth the time. Fantastic piece.

The best piece yet written, I think, about my books and the history of nerdfighteria. 

detailsofpaintings:

Vincent Van Gogh, Cypresses (details)

1889

I saw this at the Met and it was beautiful!

(via wasarahbi)

This week was long. This sunflower came my way on the longest day. I hope it makes your day a little brighter as it did mine.

This week was long. This sunflower came my way on the longest day. I hope it makes your day a little brighter as it did mine.

(via raisingb0ybarians)

arizonalady:

THIS WAS THE MOST IMPORTANT TV SEGMENT EVER.

all caps totally warranted for this topic, as it is crucial to the internet as we know it. 

Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO): Net Neutrality 

(via peterwknox:nickgrossman)